Thursday, 22 December 2011

Treatment options for bedwetting



Bedwetting is a condition that can be treated medically. If your child wets the bed, be sure to consult your doctor to eliminate other possible causes such as urinary tract infections or diabetes. Although some children outgrow bedwetting on their own, others will benefit from treatment, especially if the disease has a significant impact on their lives.

One study showed that treatment of bedwetting children improved their self-esteem. Treatment has improved their perception of their intelligence, their physical appearance and popularity. In the same study, parents have found an improvement in their child's behavior.

Among the treatment options for bedwetting, there are behavioral treatments and medications.
Behavioral treatments

Motivational therapy, which provides emotional support by reducing feelings of shame and embarrassment felt by your child. The conditioning of behavior, such as warning alarms if the bed is wet. This alarm is connected to a buffer that detects moisture that is attached to the child's pajamas or sheets. When this device picks up signs of moisture on the bed, the alarm is triggered, which warns the child and parents. For example, learning of the bladder by encouraging your child to wait longer to urinate during the day. This can help your child's bladder to hold more urine at night. These methods may take some time (weeks or months) to act.

Drug therapy

It may be that your doctor recommends drugs such as desmopressin to help control bedwetting. Desmopressin acts similarly to a natural messenger that your child's body produces to help control the amount of urine they produce at night. By helping to control the amount of urine produced during sleep, desmopressin reduces the risk that your child wets the bed. This medicine may be taken on a daily or occasional as needed (eg. A night away from home).

The treatment of nocturnal enuresis can affect your child's life positively. With an effective treatment plan, you can overcome the frustrations and embarrassment that accompany bedwetting. Talk to your doctor for more information on how to treat your child's bedwetting.