Friday, 30 September 2011

Hogweed - And it treats what?


According to Brother Marie-Victorin, the Hurons have successfully used the infusion of cow parsnip to fight the great influenza epidemic of 1918. However, this use does not appear to have been widespread since the majority of sources do not mention.

The Sisters of Providence described it as stimulating, carminative, and high-dose poison. It was used in epilepsy accompanied by flatulence and stomach upset. Treatment should continue for a long time.

Our rocking shares with a European species (H. spondilyum) a number of properties, and we can assume that the two plants differ little, in fact, in their actions because they are both rich in octanol, which is an aromatic principle attributed their action. The root, leaves and fruits of spondyle rocks were used in Europe as an aphrodisiac, stimulant, digestive, hypotensive, anthelmintic, resolved, detergent. The plant has been used to treat sexual weakness, impaired digestion, gas, high blood pressure, kidney disease and epilepsy.

The fruits have been used against gonorrhea. The root decoction is taken in at a rate of 15 grams per liter of water. It takes three glasses a day. The fruits are taken in infusion at 2 teaspoons per cup of water. We infused 10 minutes and it takes three cups a day.

Externally, we used the decoction of the root washings and compresses to treat edema, tumors, abscesses, boils and ulcers sluggish. It is prepared at 30 grams of root per liter of water.

Wednesday, 28 September 2011

Hogweed

Some attribute the Latin name of the rocks (Heracleum maximum) to the demigod Heracles (now Hercules among the Romans) because of the vast size of the plant and the impression of strength it gives off. The names of "big rocks" (H. spondilyum), "very large rocks" (H. maximum) and "giant hogweed" (H. mantegazzianum - see warning in the Precautions section) also show all of the impressive size of the plant, depending on the species, may reach 1 to 3 meters.

Others believe that just Heracleum Heraclea, an ancient city that was the birthplace of the plant. Except as Heraclea, there was apparently more in antiquity, whether in Greece, Italy or the Middle East. In any case, we can assume without much risk of error that each time the name was referring to Hercules, after all, this was one of the greatest heroes of the mythology of the time. One also wonders why, since he began his career by killing his wife and children. He then attacked a lion, a hydra, a deer, birds, under the pretext that these creatures are extremely harmful. Then, he distinguished himself by giving a king to pasture his horses (of human flesh to herbivores! What a lack of taste!) And killing the queen of the Amazons, it is assumed, would fall on him in the kidneys because of her feminist positions. Apart from that, it must be someone to tell, he did nothing much impressive cleaning stables, the capture of a boar and a few cattle, taming of a bull and apple picking in short, all activities are mainly agricultural farmer knew the time to complete.

"Hogweed" is of Germanic origin and comes from Bartsch, a name which means the plant or bartszez, a bitter drink that was manufactured in the countries of Eastern Europe, which was half of the beer and half of the soup.

It has been called "angelic wild" and "wild parsnip", because of its resemblance to these two plants of the same family that, which can be confusing since, at home, these names refer to two other plants native. It was also called "cow parsnip," modeled on the English cow parsnip, a term which, like the names of hogweed and pigweed (literally "pig weed"), may indicate a former use as a forage . The names of Indian Celery and Indian Rhubarb (Indian rhubarb) refer to food that jobs were Native Americans.

By analogy form, it has been called "bear paw" and "false acanthus." Sometimes "grass of the devil." The strange name of "cradle-Branc ursine" we give some warning to France for the moment all its mystery, "Branca" and "ursine" does not exist as such in dictionaries. Perhaps the second is it still an allusion to the bear?


Sunday, 25 September 2011

Cornflower

Closely associated with the Lac St. Jean where it abounds, the word "blueberry" - or "beluet" or "cornflower" - has come to mean, a little ironically, its inhabitants, who are said to have the same characteristics as the berries of the plant that means: half sweet, half sour, slightly pasty, but with a fabulous creative potential ...

For the French, the word is one of the popular names of another plant, the cornflower blue, which can cause some confusion since the two plants have a therapeutic effect. Hence the importance of identifying plants by their Latin name, is not it? Vaccinium angustifolium, Vaccinium myrtilloides or so.

It is believed that the name comes from medieval Latin vaccinus, vaccines, which means "cow", but no explanation is given about the reasons for this association. Is it because in Europe, blueberries have been used in pastures for cows? In any case, certainly in our blueberry fields to us, were much more likely to encounter a brown bear, gender and hypoglycemic bad mood, an ox under placid. To monitor closely.

Thursday, 22 September 2011

Cornflower - It's ecological balance

Like most plants of the Ericaceae family (to which also belong to the rhododendron, Labrador tea and wintergreen), blueberries lives in the taiga and bogs where the family forms the mass of vegetation. There are millions of individuals to occupy these environments ungrateful, unattractive to other plants.

In addition to sharing the same habitat, these species have in common is rich in tannin and live in symbiosis with fungi, Rhizoctonia root rot is one who lives with blueberries and other Vaccinium. Fascinating, is not it, that this fungus is so pleasant blueberry while it is known to destroy the roots of various vegetables and forage crops, including asparagus, alfalfa, sainfoin and clover!

Tuesday, 20 September 2011

Cornflower - it is edible!

Absurd question if this is because that child has not spent at least a few hours to pick up the blue-black berries and smearing the face of it contentment?

Moreover, if a bay that Indians have consumed in large quantities and prepared in countless ways, it is the blueberry. The Saulteaux with the cooked corn in the winter or boiled with fat moose and other foods. The Algonquins were in a kind of fruit jelly or eaten with butter or pemmican. Micmac by extracting the juice. Even the mountains, it seems, normally disdained plant foods, the snuff. For a certain time of year, it was nothing less than the base of many of their recipes. They made a particular kind of cake solids, highly nutritious and nourishing. Among the Kwakwaka'wakw of British Columbia, we ate blueberries with salmon eggs. Others in the baked bannock. Eskimos mixed them with a variety of raspberry and formed a kind of ice cream, called "Eskimo ice cream." Even today, the Inuit eat with eggs of fish, seal fat and sugar, or they mix it with sorrel and white whale. Unless they are used with the fin seal marinated, it depends.

To keep them, they were made simply dry in the sun-drying or smoking over very low heat in a basket of birch bark, using the branches of the shrub as a fuel. Or they are mixed with fat - seal, fish or moose candle. In milder climates, they are kept in baskets of birch bark that were buried in caches, covered with moss and leaves.

Saturday, 17 September 2011

Cornflower - it treat's what?


This is the European species, Vaccinium myrtillus, the huckleberry, which has been studied and used in medicine, but as the active ingredients are essentially a pigment and tannins, and our species are well equipped as the one as the other, there is no reason why they do not have the same properties. Sisters of Providence also write in their Materia Medica: "We think the huckleberry is just the same with little fruit so well known to children as the" miners "that found in our woods. "

As the berries that the leaves were used, but their properties differ significantly. Thus, only the berries are antidiarrheals. In Sweden, prepares a soup traditionally designed to combat diarrhea. But it's the brew that most often prescribed for this purpose. She is preparing for 3 c. tablespoons of dried blueberries in half-liter of water. Boil for 10 minutes and filter. Take several glasses a day. According to Dr. Fritz Weiss, blueberry juice mixture and cheese quark would be particularly effective against diarrhea summer, the acute attacks of diarrhea or dysentery. Avoid sweet juice.

Take care, eaten raw and fresh, in large quantities, blueberries has exactly the opposite effect, that is to say that it is a laxative!

To sweeten the pill for children, reduces the powdered dried blueberries, we pass it through a sieve and made into a concoction that will cook on low heat about 3 minutes. It seems they like.

Because of its astringent decoction of blueberries is also useful in inflammations of the oral cavity. It is used in mouthwash.

According to Dr. Jean Valnet, the leaf, like the Bay also is one of the strongest anticolibacillaires currently known, which was confirmed recently when it was discovered that she was just as capable as the cranberry treat cystitis caused by the accidental presence of E. coli in the urinary tract, especially in the early stages of infection as well as prevention in people with recurrent cystitis.

It would also be useful for women with menstrual cramps, a pigment having a relaxing effect on smooth muscle.

Blueberries may also prevent macular degeneration, a condition that affects 10 million Americans over the age of 50 years, and can lead to blindness. Moreover, it is given long had the power to improve eyesight, especially night vision and night.

The sheet is considered to have some anti-diabetic activity although the latter is relatively small and does not allow to dispense with insulin or other medications usually prescribed for this purpose. It would, however, to mitigate the problems that accompany this disease, including retinitis and angiopathies. It would also increase the resistance of capillaries. Atherosclerosis, circulatory disorders (hypertension, coronary heart disease and capillary fragility) respond well to treatment. It is taken in decoction for 40 g of leaves per liter of water. Boiled 5 minutes and steep for 10 minutes. It can take up to one liter per day. The dye is taken as 50 to 100 drops, 3 times a day.

We have also used the root decoction with 15 g to 20 g per liter of water as a compress on wounds to clean them up and heal.

It will dry the blueberries in the sun or in rain, in the oven or a dehydrator. By cons, leaves and roots are dried in the shade, as it should.

Friday, 16 September 2011

Cornflower - it treat's what?


This is the European species, Vaccinium myrtillus, the huckleberry, which has been studied and used in medicine, but as the active ingredients are essentially a pigment and tannins, and our species are well equipped as the one as the other, there is no reason why they do not have the same properties. Sisters of Providence also write in their Materia Medica: "We think the huckleberry is just the same with little fruit so well known to children as the" miners "that found in our woods. "

As the berries that the leaves were used, but their properties differ significantly. Thus, only the berries are antidiarrheals. In Sweden, prepares a soup traditionally designed to combat diarrhea. But it's the brew that most often prescribed for this purpose. She is preparing for 3 c. tablespoons of dried blueberries in half-liter of water. Boil for 10 minutes and filter. Take several glasses a day. According to Dr. Fritz Weiss, blueberry juice mixture and cheese quark would be particularly effective against diarrhea summer, the acute attacks of diarrhea or dysentery. Avoid sweet juice.

Take care, eaten raw and fresh, in large quantities, blueberries has exactly the opposite effect, that is to say that it is a laxative!

To sweeten the pill for children, reduces the powdered dried blueberries, we pass it through a sieve and made into a concoction that will cook on low heat about 3 minutes. It seems they like.

Because of its astringent decoction of blueberries is also useful in inflammations of the oral cavity. It is used in mouthwash.

According to Dr. Jean Valnet, the leaf, like the Bay also is one of the strongest anticolibacillaires currently known, which was confirmed recently when it was discovered that she was just as capable as the cranberry treat cystitis caused by the accidental presence of E. coli in the urinary tract, especially in the early stages of infection as well as prevention in people with recurrent cystitis.

It would also be useful for women with menstrual cramps, a pigment having a relaxing effect on smooth muscle.

Blueberries may also prevent macular degeneration, a condition that affects 10 million Americans over the age of 50 years, and can lead to blindness. Moreover, it is given long had the power to improve eyesight, especially night vision and night.

The sheet is considered to have some anti-diabetic activity although the latter is relatively small and does not allow to dispense with insulin or other medications usually prescribed for this purpose. It would, however, to mitigate the problems that accompany this disease, including retinitis and angiopathies. It would also increase the resistance of capillaries. Atherosclerosis, circulatory disorders (hypertension, coronary heart disease and capillary fragility) respond well to treatment. It is taken in decoction for 40 g of leaves per liter of water. Boiled 5 minutes and steep for 10 minutes. It can take up to one liter per day. The dye is taken as 50 to 100 drops, 3 times a day.

We have also used the root decoction with 15 g to 20 g per liter of water as a compress on wounds to clean them up and heal.

It will dry the blueberries in the sun or in rain, in the oven or a dehydrator. By cons, leaves and roots are dried in the shade, as it should.

Wednesday, 14 September 2011

Additional uses of Burdock



According to Dr. Jean Valnet, the root must be used fresh, not dried, otherwise it would lose most of its properties. Which limits the use in the spring and fall. To prepare, boil 60 grams of fresh root in a liter of water for ten minutes.

Moreover, one can also prepare it for dyeing. In France, there is an extract of burdock stabilized, but to my knowledge, there is nothing like here.

The fresh leaves were applied as a poultice against chronic lung disease, colds and rheumatism towed, soaked in olive oil, they would hasten the healing of leg ulcers and wounds in general.

They were also used to prevent hair loss. It manufactures a lotion made by boiling a cup of leaves in two cups of water. We pass, allowed to cool and apply on the scalp. Is it very effective? Probably not, but unlike conventional treatments that are not either, at least it has the advantage of being free.

In 1890, the Sisters of Providence in their Materia Medica wrote that "according to recent experiments, made by a distinguished physician of the EU, the seeds of burdock are a true specific against diseases of the skin, even the most inveterate" . To prepare the remedy, we spent two or three times in a coffee mill 450 grams of seeds and were then added to a gallon of warm whiskey. Were allowed to "digest" in a warm place for several weeks making sure to stir every day, then filtered. The dose of one tablespoon three times daily before meals. It was necessary, they said, take several months but the outcome was assured. Or, we will prepare a bitter burdock and Aral, purifying properties proved. The great burdock (Arctium lappa) is much rarer than the Burdock (Arctium minor), found it, throughout Quebec, particularly in vacant lots, the land disturbed by recent culture, etc.. It can also be cultivated. Richter's sells seeds of burdock common, as well as a variety of Japanese, in addition to being tastier, have potent antitumor properties.

Burdock - And it treats what?


In Oriental medicine, we used the juice of burdock against appendicitis at a rate of half a glass that is recommended to drink at once. In addition, we used a decoction of seeds (10 to 20 grams per cup of water) to treat tumors of the breast or lymph gland, for diseases of the digestive tract such as stomach cramps and case of lack of vitality. We treat anemia with traditional kinpira (literally "golden peace" or "precious pieces flattened") of burdock, which is flat to cook in a skillet root cut into matchsticks. It blew up the pieces for 2 or 3 minutes in oil, add a little water and simmer until tender. It is seasoned with a little tamari sauce and baked a few more minutes, covered. Then, remove the lid and leave everything on the heat until liquid has evaporated.

European tradition has made an herb greatly appreciated, especially for its purifying qualities. Scavengers, what! It is also diaphoretic, diuretic, choleretic, diabetes, antibiotics, topical, antidotal. It has been used to treat boils, anthrax, abscesses and dental throat, dermatitis, acne, eczema, wounds, ringworm, measles, gout, rheumatism, diabetes, urinary stones and bites of vipers. Its use in cases of diabetes explained by its high inulin, a complex sugar that diabetics can learn.

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Tuesday, 13 September 2011

Burdock - how to consume it?


From Europe, burdock has appeared in the diet of Native Americans only recently, hence the lack of documented uses that are available for this purpose. We know that the Iroquois were eating the young leaves boiled and employed the dried root in the soup. Among the Lillooet, British Columbia, we picked the root before the appearance of leaves and is eaten raw.

By cons, in Europe, it was much used in the countryside. First of all its leaves, only the very young, because they become bitter developing. Then the leaf petioles, which can be eaten raw or cooked when they are not bitter and can be lacto-fermented. Then the young shoots, just out of the ground, which can be eaten raw as long as we peel the first to remove the bitter part. They can also be pickled. However, quite often they are infested by the stem borer burdock, which makes them much less attractive.

Japan is probably that it consumes the greatest amount of burdock per head pipe. These people, who brought the art of cooking to a refinement of exquisite simplicity, has developed varieties less bitter and more tender it prepares a vegetable such as carrots, parsnips and salsify.

The root can also be lacto-fermented. In addition, as chicory, dandelion, artichoke and salsify - incidentally, four plants of the same family - it was used to make a coffee substitute.

Something to remember: when you cut the root, it oxidizes quickly. After cut, so it is recommended to put the pieces to soak a few minutes in very cold water.

Burdock - Its role in the ecological balance


"Weed awkward and cumbersome to enact Brother Marie-Victorin, which is not acceptable anywhere. "It's quite the view of my neighbor, who suggested, very gently indeed, cut all the plants that grow on my property and put them through the ultimate sacrifice of fire. If he were to discover that I grow in my garden, it would eventually ruin my reputation, already compromised by the fact that I absolutely refuse to mow the wild plants growing on the roadside along my property as all good citizens of the region. By the way, in the language of plants, burdock means "intrusiveness."

With great intelligence botany, the plant has developed three ways to disseminate its seeds. Let the fruit come together in platoons as the wind rolled on the floor. They either remain on the stem and eventually open up to spread their seeds. But the third is by far the brightest: clinging to fleece animals - including the tails of cats and dogs - or to clothing and hair of humans, they travel to places gratos sometimes far removed from their place of birth, places the plant will be quick to colonize the detriment of all other plant species that have no chance against his fierce competitiveness. It's like that, it seems, we conquered territory.

Monday, 12 September 2011

Burdock



Arctium comes from the Greek and means "bear", in allusion to the involucre, writes Marie-Victorin. The involucre, for which I was ignorant until a few hours, "a meeting of bracts, whorled, or nested, inserted at the base of an umbel, a flower head or any other inflorescence. " Ah well thank you! That explains everything! Unless someone could please explain to me the relationship with the bear or did I mind too obtuse to grasp the obvious? Some argue that it would be because the inflorescence is rough and unkempt, but that, frankly, it does not stick. Unless this is an allusion to the massive plantigrade claws, which, as everyone knows, are not retractable. No more than are the bracts of the involucre of burdock, as we have all experienced the day he had to cut to the heart of the hair to remove them.

The name is French even more obscure. For some, it would be a metaphorical use of the Lyon "burdock", which meant "bug". All this comes from the popular Latin barrum, which means "mud," the pin-like stain. You understand something, you at this gibberish? Others say that he would rather the radical baritare Latin meaning "oppose, differ." Youhou! You should hear it!

Lappa, meaning "seize, take," was the name of the genre before Mr. Linnaeus arrived with his new terminology and pushing the species level. The Romans designated and all the plants whose fruits cling to clothes.

Due to its characteristics, especially its fruit, burdock has been awarded many popular names over the centuries: artichoke, wild rhubarb, tobacco devil's prey, graquias, toques, Bourrier choubourrache, cocklebur, cleavers, péterolle ... And "love": the kind of flies which Spike can not get rid!

French children call "buttons fire" the fruits they have fun to hang in rows on their clothes. However, to Anglophones, they lose the grade since nicknamed "buttons on the beggar" (beggar's buttons). In my youth, they were known simply as the "pipiques."

Finally, in France, it has also been called "the scabby grass" because of its effectiveness against chronic disease of the skin and scalp.

Monday, 5 September 2011

Bay rose hip - it treats what?



Very rich in vitamin C - all things considered, the bay would be 20 times richer in this vitamin than an orange - it has been used to fight infections, particularly influenza. It is said that during the Second World War, the British and the Scandinavians were completely deprived of citrus and they intended solely jam rosehips as a source of vitamin C.

Probably for the same reasons, the rose hips were used to treat fatigue and asthenia. He was taken with 2 tablespoons of dried pulp and reduced into pieces that were made brew in one liter of cold water (or 2-5 g per cup of water), bring to a boil, and filtered drinking. It was also used as an astringent to fight diarrhea, dysentery, leucorrhoea and bleeding.

Sunday, 4 September 2011

China and Bay rose hip



In China, where rose Medicinal are documented for nearly 30 centuries, the berries of a local variety are used against the dysfunction of the urinary tract and, because of their astringency, against chronic diarrhea.

Prepared in syrup, they are widely used to give a pleasant flavor to these medicinal drinks that, historically, children have attempted to spit out systematically, in defiance of common sense. The pills of quinine, in particular, who were extremely bitter and that coated with a "making of dog roses" prepared on the basis of some pulp to two parts sugar which was triturated until all of a uniform paste.

The "seeds" and their hair is known to be diuretics. Be sure to pass the tea well before taking it. One of the best ways to keep the berries all their richness in vitamin C, to prepare a raw puree. The flesh is removed by removing the seeds and their hair and passed just to the mixer. We can add this puree to morning cereal or stewed. But it must be eaten as soon as possible because it does not keep.

The flowers are mainly used in cosmetics. Because of their astringent properties, they are supposed to tighten pores and firm up the grain. They were also used as a mild laxative and as a healing in ulcers, wounds and fungal inflammation of the eyelids.

The "bédégar" caused a gall on the leaves of the wild rose by an insect, was once used as an anthelmintic, diuretic and lithotripsy, but later it was used exclusively as an astringent.

This is usually the bay dog rose (Rosa canina) that is used in medicine. It is not native to our region but it can be found occasionally in some protected environments where temperatures are consistent with those of zone 5. It can also be provided to implement protection against cold weather.

The rose hip rose (Rosa eglanteria) is found in waste places - including pastures - especially in calcareous soil. The thornless rose (Rosa blanda) is found in dry places, especially limestone, throughout Quebec. The rough rose (Rosa rugosa) is an escaped cultivation and is therefore especially around the old gardens.

Saturday, 3 September 2011

Bay rose hip - it is edible!



The berries of different varieties of wild rose were eaten by many tribes throughout the Indian where it grows. They were considered an excellent food for survival since they remain attached to the plant all winter. We made a decoction and certain people, a beer. In summer, it also consumed the petals of flowers. The Blackfoot crushed berries and mix with pemmican. By the way, did you know that since 1819 - the date of its discovery by English explorer and sailor - the pemmican is the staple food of all polar expeditions because of its high nutritional value, reducing its volume and sound quality conservation? Originally composed of dried meat, powdered and mixed with grease, the traditional food of Native Americans of the Hudson Bay has had some modern variants but the basic principle remains exactly the same: basically dried meat and a fat, which may be added powdered vegetables, dry cereal, dried fruit and some sugar.

The Eskimos of Alaska make a sort of pudding with pulp crushed rose hips, oil seal, water and sugar. They also added the berries in a dish consisting of salmon tails of pre-masticated (pre-chewed? Lord, I can hear the protests of food inspectors!) And dried. Today, they are quite prepared syrup, jam, jelly, marmalade and ketchup, alone or mixed with various other fruits. The Tanainas mix it with grease or fish eggs, or the fight with a fat into a kind of ice cream. In some tribes, the leaves were placed in the pit cooking to flavor dishes that are cooked in the coals. It was also a decoction of the leaves and young twigs.

Homo sapiens sapiens and his wife are not the only ones to find the bay slightly acidic. It seems indeed that Ursus - regardless of species or sex - see it as a pre-hibernation food choices.

Whatever the recipe used, consider the following:

* Just before cooking, prepare the berries by cutting the ends with scissors;
* such as berries are acidic, it is better to use wooden utensils and pans, stainless steel or Pyrex so they do not turn black on contact with an oxidizable metal;
* cook quickly covering to limit the loss of vitamin C;
* filter through a fine sieve to remove seeds and hairs, which are irritants.

We can make beer, wine, jelly or jam (see recipe in our Related Documents). The Swedes make a soup, they eat hot or cold and they prepare by grinding the berries and by boiling for ten minutes. Pass, return to the heat, bring to a boil and thicken with 4 tablespoons potato starch or flour diluted in 2 cups of cold water.

The berries of all varieties of roses - wild or cultivated - are consumed but among the wild varieties, that of Rosa rugosa is the largest and therefore easiest to prepare. However, during walks, it is much more likely to fall on Rosa blanda, that despite his nickname "Pink Pig", it should certainly not be underestimated. They should be picked, preferably after a first frost, which has the effect of the tender. It is imperative to avoid harvesting the berries on plants that are believed to be treated with chemicals.

Friday, 2 September 2011

Bay rose hip


Rosa is possibly a Sanskrit word which means "flexible", without knowing the flexibility of what exactly it is. What is known is that a few spelling variants near the word is the same in all European languages, which would be an indication of its great antiquity.

"Rose hips" hateful word that never comes or write or speak properly, kunorodon comes from the Greek, which literally means "dog rose", in allusion to its alleged properties to protect against the bites of rabid dogs . The name of the variety Rosa canina (dog rose) also refers to the medicinal use so ancient that no trace found in the materia medica of the last centuries.

Note that the "rose hips" means especially the receptacle containing red fruits (incorrectly called "seeds") of the rose and briar, or the part used in cooking or medicine.

It is also called the plant "hip" because of the hair attached to the seeds - fruit, forgiveness - and that children once used as itching powder. This tradition has also been found among Native Americans who claimed that those who consumed the hairs were afflicted with painful itching later.

"Dog Rose" comes from the Latin aquilentum People, "which has spicy," of acus, "tip, needle." Contrary to what is sometimes said, "wild rose" is not the result but the flower.

In Quebec, it was sometimes called the wild rose as the "cébreur" by deformation of the popular English name sweetbrier. However, the Brier sweetbrier would he, a corruption of French "heather", a shrub that this name means, which name, family form, the English were also attributed to the wild rose. Ah! The fluidity of language!

Thursday, 1 September 2011

Elecampane - it treats what?



According to Dr. Jean Valnet, the light is one of the most valuable plants. Antiseptic soothing, drying of the airways, it was used to treat everything that is called bronchitis, cough, pulmonary tuberculosis, bronchial asthma, although it is not so effective for asthma ordinary. Tonic, diuretic, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, it also treated the nephritis, anemia, general fatigue, painful periods or no periods, the white discharge, intestinal parasites, diarrhea, gout, and by externally, dermatitis, pruritus, ulcers, bedsores and tracheitis. Rich in inulin, a sugar not comparable, it would be useful to diabetics, as, indeed, other plants of the Compositae family that contain. Chicory, or beard-de-capuchin, among others.

- The nose and beard of the Capuchins, you say?
- Pardon?
- Yes, the tea, you take it on the nose and beard of the Capuchins?
- Ah! Ah! Really funny!
- By the way, you know that the Latin equivalent of "monk" was cappuccino?
- Oh! Nice! Because of the cap, I suppose?
- From the hood, more specifically, a cap point size.
- Fascinating, but it derives a lot, I think.

We take the light in the form of decoction with 10 to 20 grams per liter of water a cup before each meal. Or as a stain for 15 to 20 drops, four to five times a day. Dried and powdered root can be taken as a proportion of 2 to 10 g in any liquid, a cup of chicken broth, for example.

If you have had the good idea to dry St John's wort and ground ivy in season, you can prepare a potion designed to treat bronchitis and cough that may occur during the winter, mixing the three plants equally and infusing the whole ten minutes at a rate of one teaspoon per cup of water. Take three cups a day, before or after meals.

To treat skin diseases, especially pruritus, wash the affected part with a decoction prepared at 30 g per liter of water.

In China, we use flowers of Inula japonica to treat asthma and bronchitis accompanied by an overflow of mucus, and vomiting and acid reflux.

It is found occasionally around Montreal and Quebec, or the Gaspé. It prefers damp places. If you can not find, you can cultivate. You can choose from the variety usually well adapted to our climate and Goliath, a spectacular variety with large flowers, which is less hardy and therefore requires protection of straw or leaves over the winter.